96 Buick Roadmaster rear axle brake lines

It's pronounced "chassy." Brakes, suspension...things that make the car fun or a death trap
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kevm14
Posts: 13795
Joined: Wed Oct 23, 2013 10:28 pm

96 Buick Roadmaster rear axle brake lines

Post by kevm14 » Sun Mar 01, 2020 11:51 am

I have some 3/16" Cu-Ni line which will need double flares at all ends.

I went to Advance Auto to get fittings. Everything is 3/8-24, including the bleeders. I got 4 short flare nuts and 2 long ones just in case. Irritatingly, they were $9 EACH which seems insane but I guess they are not regular steel. Not sure what they are (brass?). The Dorman bleeders were only $2.49 for both. I may return the two unused flare nuts since that's actually $18 + tax.

So the total would be $41. Plus brake fluid I guess. I have some but I bought an extra quart at $7.99 ($8.55). Plan is to attack this after lunch. Hopefully I don't need to do the wheel cylinders. Advance only had one in stock anyway.

kevm14
Posts: 13795
Joined: Wed Oct 23, 2013 10:28 pm

Re: 96 Buick Roadmaster rear axle brake lines

Post by kevm14 » Sun Mar 01, 2020 6:33 pm

Damn. This took me like over 5 hours. But I got the new lines in, bent sort of ugly. Saved the wheel cylinders with no issue. Had to vice grip off the flare nuts at the rear brake hose after bending the line enough to break it off at the nut. There is no working room - I guess I didn't jack the car up high enough. I had to work at the top of the diff which I really couldn't see without my head hitting the gas tank and the wheel cylinders are also above the axle. With the rear fender skirts working from the side was also obnoxious. I am getting tired of this routine. I want a Quickjack.

Haven't road tested yet...hope it's fine.

I suctioned out the master cylinder and replaced with new fluid. It didn't look all that good and the rear line reservoir had some gunk at the bottom. So the rear circuit should have 100% new fluid. The front circuit at least the reservoir has all new fluid. I didn't bleed the front brakes and actually only removed the left rear wheel for the job.

kevm14
Posts: 13795
Joined: Wed Oct 23, 2013 10:28 pm

Re: 96 Buick Roadmaster rear axle brake lines

Post by kevm14 » Sun Mar 01, 2020 8:50 pm

kevm14 wrote:
Sun Mar 01, 2020 6:33 pm
Haven't road tested yet...hope it's fine.
Well that went sideways. And I don't mean the car. Brakes seemed fine. Feels like the shoes need to be adjusted but then stupid drums always feel that way. Maybe I'll adjust them next time. However, when I parked, I noticed a stream of fluid on the driveway. It was NOT out of the garage where I pulled out so it happened as I was road testing. Shockingly, it seemed to be coming from the front of the car. Oh no.
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Oil was literally spraying out from the lower oil cooler line. Jesus. Well, now the car is once again parked until I fix that. Fortunately I already did the oil filter adapter gasket and O-ring so I can just do the lines. Now I have to order some and hope I don't crack the radiator end tank like I did on my Fleetwood some 12 years ago.

Good thing I topped off the oil while it was in the garage. It was 1/2 a quart low. Good thing I didn't just drive it to work tomorrow!! I have no idea how much oil came out on my test drive.

Fast_Ed
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Re: 96 Buick Roadmaster rear axle brake lines

Post by Fast_Ed » Fri Mar 06, 2020 1:53 pm

Wow, definitely a good thing you didn't just drive to work. Though, the RMW has a low oil indicator, and your sedan prob does as well. So you might not have toasted the engine

kevm14
Posts: 13795
Joined: Wed Oct 23, 2013 10:28 pm

Re: 96 Buick Roadmaster rear axle brake lines

Post by kevm14 » Fri Mar 06, 2020 1:58 pm

I don't know if that circuit is made to turn the light on while driving. Maybe?

From memory, the way it worked in my Caprice is, it would have a very simple timer and make a measurement some time after ignition off (after the oil drains back), and maybe right at ignition on. I don't think it checks continuously while running. The actual oil level in the sump is much lower while running, and also varies with engine RPM (oil flow).

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